BranD #70 - Logo Face

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BranD #70 - Logo Face

From the editor about this issue:

n 1865, Procter & Gamble designed a logo which features stars and a moon with a man's face, and printed it on the packaging of each bar of soap. It is generally regarded as the world's first true trademark. Twenty years later, the government in the United States established the related trademark law, which marks the formal registration of trademarks for products. From then on, the thinking of trademark came into being, and the concept of brand was gradually introduced into the commodity world.


From the end of the 19" Century to the 20" Century, the world was fascinated by the trademark system, and brands have been recognized and guaranteed by law. A large number of excellent brands, including Coca-Cola, Mercedes-Benz, Gillette, Kodak, Ford, Boeing, and Nestlé, have activated the market and inspired a group of advertising experts, educators, thinkers, and graphic designers with insights into brands from different angles, who have subtly changed our lifestyles through the influence of brands. In 1955, David Ogilvy, the founder of Ogilvy & Mather and "The Godfather of Advertising," defined a brand as "The intangible sum of a product's attributes: its name, packaging, and price, its history, its reputation, and the way it's advertised." To design a brand, one should embrace diversity from the logo design as the starting point, instead of using the logo only to distinguish categories and unique selling points.


Paul Rand, a graphic designer who was deeply influenced by Bauhaus architectural aesthetics and European font art, proposed that an excellent logo should be simple, distinctive, visible, adaptable, memorable, timeless, and universal.
For him, a good brand design should adopt a concise expression without gorgeous words, while a bad one is often superficial and a mere formality. Rand's books Thoughts on Design, Design and the Play Instinct, Paul Rand: A Designer's Art, etc., are still best-sellers around the world.


"LOGO FACE" is BranD's first issue about logos. In this issue, we are going to start from logo design, the first step of brand design, to discuss the elements and viewpoints in today's logo design, which may or may not have changed, through the interviews and works.

About BranD:

BranD defines a new way to look into communication design by presenting, researching, and manifesting excellent works in visual art, advertising, product, graphic design, and more. Every issue defines a theme and invites worldwide notable branding designers to analyze and discuss the methodology behind meeting diverse customer demands, meanwhile enhancing the brand value through high-quality design.